FATHER'S DAY GIFT GUIDE 🍳

 

The best Brussels sprouts dishes combine the earthy brassica with complementary flavors and textures, usually something sweet, and something crunchy. This is why there’s nearly a million recipes for sprouts with maple syrup and bacon on the Internet.

Instead of adding to the pile, we took the earthy-sweet-crunchy trifecta in a new direction—and, of course, packed it into a cast iron skillet. While we’re fans of roasted brussels sprouts, a hot oven loves to dry them out, so you must either blanch them first or add some liquid at the end of cooking. Our method calls for first searing the sprouts in a good amount of fat, then adding enough water to steam the sprouts under a covered skillet.

Photo: Lauren V. Allen

The seared-and-steamed sprouts are then finished with something sweet—a tangy honey-butter glaze—and something extra crunchy: a generous sprinkling of dukkah, an Egyptian nut and spice blend. Our dukkah recipe leaves you with plenty extra for using as a crust for roasted meats, mixed with yogurt or olive oil for a dip, or sprinkling over anything that benefits from some spiced crunch, from salads and grain bowls to pretty much any vegetable side dish.

recipe

Seared-and-Steamed Brussels Sprouts with Honey Glaze and Dukkah

Ingredients

1 pound brussels sprouts, trimmed and halved lengthwise
¼ cup olive oil or other cooking fat (vegetable oil, bacon grease, duck fat, coconut oil, etc.)
Kosher salt
¼ cup honey
2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
¼ cup chopped parsley
1 lemon, for zesting
Dukkah, for serving (recipe follows)

Instructions

1.

Heat the oil in a No.8 (10 ¼”) cast iron skillet over medium-high heat until it begins to shimmer. Add the sprouts in an even layer, cut-side down, and season with salt. Cook without disturbing until the bottom of the sprouts are deeply browned, 5 to 7 minutes. Using tongs, turn the sprouts over and season with salt. Add ¼ cup of water to the skillet, cover, and cook over medium-low heat until the sprouts are tender throughout and the water has been absorbed, 7 to 10 minutes.

2.

While the sprouts cook, make the honey glaze: In a small saucepan, bring the honey to a simmer over medium-high heat and cook, whisking occasionally, until it darkens a shade or two, about 3 minutes. Add the vinegar, butter, and ½ teaspoon salt and return to a simmer. Cook until slightly thickened, 3 to 5 minutes.

3.

Transfer the cooked sprouts to a bowl, add half of the honey glaze and toss well. Taste and add more glaze if desired, and toss again. Transfer to a serving bowl and sprinkle generously with the dukkah. Sprinkle with parsley, grate some lemon zest over the sprouts, and serve.

Recipe

Dukkah

Yield: about 2 cups

Ingredients

3 tablespoons shelled pistachios (preferably raw)
3 tablespoons raw cashews
3 tablespoons blanched almonds
3 tablespoons blanched skinless hazelnuts
3 tablespoons sesame seeds
1 tablespoon coriander seeds
1 tablespoon cumin seeds
1 teaspoon fennel seeds
1 teaspoon kosher salt
¼ teaspoon freshly ground pepper

Instructions

1.

Scatter the nuts in a rimmed baking sheet and use the bottom of a cast-iron skillet to crush them into smaller pieces.

2.

Heat a cast iron skillet over medium-low heat. Add the nuts and toast, stirring frequently, until golden brown and fragrant, 5 to 7 minutes. Transfer to a bowl and let cool.

3.

Add the sesame seeds to the skillet and toast, stirring constantly, until the seeds begin to turn golden brown, 2 to 3 minutes. Transfer to a small bowl and let cool.

4.

Add the coriander, cumin, and fennel seeds to the skillet and cook, stirring constantly, until fragrant and lightly toasted, 2 to 3 minutes. Transfer to the food processor and add cooled nuts, salt and pepper. Pulse until the nuts are finely chopped, and the mixture resembles coarse sand. Transfer to a bowl and stir in the sesame seeds. Store in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 2 weeks.